American History in Black and White – part 3 of 3

And finally, the last video in the series.

So what have you learned? What do you think? Frankly, the scrubbing and silencing of American history makes my blood boil.

Video

American History in Black and White – part 2 of 3

Now for Part 2 of the video “American History in Black and White.”

Tune in at this time next week for the third and final part.

American History in Black and White – part 1 of 3

For me, this is now “old news,” because as a homeschooling family we have always sought out a better and well-rounded history, but for many people, this will be new, and astonishing, information!

If you find history interesting, if you don’t, or just think you know the history of slavery in America, this video will blow your mind.

Points in this part:

  • American revolution – black soldiers, fully integrated armies. Famous revolutionaries: James Armistead, Peter Salem, Prince Whipple.
  • Paintings with surprises
  • Historic Black Writers about blacks in history: William Nell, Carter Woodson, Benjamin Quarles, Joseph Wilson, Booker T. Washington, Edward A. Johnson
  • The Constitution and the “3/5 clause” arguments, origins, intent.
  • Frederick Douglass – history, education, writings, discovery that 3/5 clause is anti-slavery.
  • 1789 – Northwest Ordinance passed, forbidding slavery in new areas
  • 1792 – Democratic National Committee founded
  • 1808 – Congress abolished slave trade (Rev. Absalom Jones, first black bishop in Episcopal Church, gave sermon in Philadelphia commemorating it)
  • 1820 – Jefferson’s Democratic Party now in majority. Their Congress passed Missouri Compromise (reversing Northwest Ordinance), permitting slavery in almost 1/2 of federal territories. Several states then admitted as slave states and, for the first time since the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, slavery officially promoted by Congressional policy.
  • 1850 – Fugitive Slave Law, passed by Democratic Congress. A disaster for free blacks and Underground Railroad at its peak in this time.
  • 1854 – Kansas-Nebraska Act, passed by Democratic Congress, allowed slavery to be introduced into parts of new territories where previously forbidden.
  • May 1854 – Anti-slavery Democrats in Congress formed the (new) Republican party to fight slavery and secure equal rights for black Americans. One founder: Sen. Charles Sumner (had championed desegregation of Boston public schools).
  • 1856 – Sumner’s 2-day long speech in U.S. Senate against slavery. Preston Brooks (Rep – D) from South Carolina clubbed down Sumner on floor of Senate, nearly beating him to death. Many Democrats thought it amusing and that he deserved it. Sumner recovered enough after 3-1/2 years, to return to Senate and give another anti-slavery speech.
  • 1856 – Republicans’ first Presidential election. First party platform had 6 of the 9 planks with bold declarations of equality and civil rights for African-Americans. Democratic Platform was boldly opposite.

Some people may continue on their own to watch the 2nd and 3rd parts, but I will be posting those out next week at this time, anyway.

There is an associated book: “Setting the Record Straight: American History in Black & White” which is “a unique view of the religious and moral heritage of African-Americans.”

Black American Founders

This video is Glen Beck’s May 28, 2010’s Founders’ Friday in which he talks about black American founders with David Barton (of Wall Builders) and Lucas Morel (professor at Washington and Lee University). I would be willing to bet real money that unless you follow Glen or read books written by David Barton, MOST of this will come as a complete surprise to you. If not, let me know so I can congratulate you!

He observes that moving media has typically portrayed blacks in historical shows and movies in subservient / slave / victim roles, and is incensed. Then he shows period paintings (Battle of Bunker Hill, Battle of Lexington, Washington Crossing the Delaware, Marquis de Lafayette, etc.) and points out key black people in the paintings, who were very important, or even that should have been there but were NOT. Things that NOBODY mentions…anymore. Though they used to be taught, until history was scrubbed and re-written in order to promote the victim narrative.

He reveals Black history that most people don’t know and the audience is surprised (first black Speaker of the House was in…1789), then appalled and outraged. So was I. There is so much more that will blow your mind. Watch it and let me know what you discovered and surprised you the most, and your reactions.

 

“Punch, Brothers, Punch!”

twainFor those who read widely, those words may have a familiar (even ominous?) ring. Mark Twain was a gifted writer, but this short “story,” if you will, is intended (as much great literature is) to be read aloud. It’s not long,  but it is…entertaining, and worth the unaccustomed effort of loosening up your jaws and tongue to speak someone else’ words and inhabit his tale.

But as you do, please speak “with care,”
for you may become another “passenjare.”

Source: Punch, Brothers, Punch by Mark Twain

Muslims and Jesus – Part 1. Mohammad Yamout

Muslim Mondays? It’s hard to know how to title this new…”series?” I expect it to have a  limited audience, but I want to try to help people to not fear and hate Muslims.

Yes, there’s a segment of Islam that leans toward radical (but only a segment) who have bad intentions against us and the “West” (I’m under no illusions, nor am I a mushy-brained fool living in fantasy land), but that’s not all of them. It’s so much more complex, because they are people, just like you and me.

Many Muslims are very unhappy at seeing this increasingly violent side of a religion that even they thought/were taught was a “religion of peace.” Many are frankly looking at other monotheistic religions, some out of curiosity, and some from disillusionment, and there’s a ground-swell of those who are believing in Jesus (Isa) in record numbers, in spite of the very real risk of losing everything, of persecution, and even death!

I don’t plan to do much explaining, because that accomplishes nothing. Instead, meet them through their stories and learn that way. Mohammed’s story is not dramatic, nor intense, but it’s interesting to learn how he grew up and what he’s now doing for others. He’s warm, gentle and loving, and I think that if you are willing to listen to his 44 minutes  (most others are shorter) you will gain a new perspective, and it may even challenge you.

As a Jesus Follower I see how important each one of them are to God, for He loves them too, and wants them to be with Him forever, just like every other person. I’m also one of an even smaller (but growing!) number of people who, frankly, love them, and not just because I spent years in the Middle East. May God bless this small endeavor.

Sunday Insight – Intellectual Sunni Decides to Follow Jesus

People don’t always pick the best Youtube video titles, and this one doesn’t adequately reflect the content, but that’s a constant problem.

This young Turk did not want to become a Christian but, faced with things he didn’t understand, was intellectually honest enough to seek answers and facts, no matter how he felt. His path to faith in Jesus (Isa) was not all that unusual for a Muslim, but for those who aren’t familiar with their accounts and how it affects them, the stories are intriguing. He now has a clear goal and, if he is not martyred before then, is going to be a great leader.

“The Future of Language: American Sign Language for everyone but the Deaf”

That is the subtitle of a blog post: Sara Nović: Sign of the Times. She writes about the struggle between “deaf culture” and the clinical approach to attempting  to eradicate biological deafness, and how deaf people perceive it. Very enlightening and interesting, particularly if you know any deaf/hearing-impaired people.

The Future of Language: American Sign Language for everyone but the Deaf

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Sometimes we all need to read really GREAT writing.

Yesterday I was reading an article and then I idly clicked on this article and was in writer’s heaven! The writer takes the death of a lonely hoarder and writes a masterpiece of humanity and information. Bloggers, this man is an award-winning writer, and his work will take your breath away. Since its source doesn’t have the features I need, I can’t reblog it, so I will give you the beginning, then you can follow the link to the full article.

The Lonely Death of George Bell

Each year around 50,000 people die in New York, some alone and unseen. Yet death even in such forlorn form can cause a surprising amount of activity. Sometimes, along the way, a life’s secrets are revealed.

They found him in the living room, crumpled up on the mottled carpet. The police did. Sniffing a fetid odor, a neighbor had called 911. The apartment was in north-central Queens, in an unassertive building on 79th Street in Jackson Heights.

The apartment belonged to a George Bell. He lived alone. Thus the presumption was that the corpse also belonged to George Bell. It was a plausible supposition, but it remained just that, for the puffy body on the floor was decomposed and unrecognizable. Clearly the man had not died on July 12, the Saturday last year when he was discovered, nor the day before nor the day before that. He had lain there for a while, nothing to announce his departure to the world, while the hyperkinetic city around him hurried on with its business.

Neighbors had last seen him six days earlier, a Sunday. On Thursday, there was a break in his routine. The car he always kept out front and moved from one side of the street to the other to obey parking rules sat on the wrong side. A ticket was wedged beneath the wiper. The woman next door called Mr. Bell. His phone rang and rang.

Then the smell of death and the police and the sobering reason that George Bell did not move his car.

Each year around 50,000 people die in New York, and each year the mortality rate seems to graze a new low, with people living healthier and longer. A great majority of the deceased have relatives and friends who soon learn of their passing and tearfully assemble at their funeral. A reverent death notice appears. Sympathy cards accumulate. When the celebrated die or there is some heart-rending killing of the innocent, the entire city might weep.

A much tinier number die alone in unwatched struggles. No one collects their bodies. No one mourns the conclusion of a life. They are just a name added to the death tables. In the year 2014, George Bell, age 72, was among those names.

George Bell — a simple name, two syllables, the minimum. There were no obvious answers as to who he was or what shape his life had taken. What worries weighed on him. Whom he loved and who loved him.

(click link to read the whole article) The Lonely Death of George Bell

An Examination of Lives that are Supposed to Matter

In Rochester, NY there has been too much violence this year, largely by and on young black males. Of course, there are then the obligatory marches, vigils, speeches and posturing, yet the violence continues unabated. Of course. Bandaids don’t stop the source of the problem, which no one really wants to speak to/about because it is ugly and politically incorrect and requires a spine and fighting spirit. Enter Tommy Davis, a man of color with insight, wisdom, who pulls no punches as he tells it like it is without posturing or pandering! Bless him, and may more people hear what he has to say.

tommy lawbooks2

by Tommy Davis

Once again, and far too often, the Rochester community is displaying an expressive reaction in response to the persistent violence in our city. Young black men are settling disputes by fatally reducing their opposition. Politicians and religious representatives are blaming poverty in an effort to rationalize why violence is so common among black Americans.

As I continue to engage in research as a PhD student at Piedmont International University while employed as a full-time contract chaplain at the Monroe County Sheriff’s Office, I am beginning to uncover some interesting facts that oppose conventional wisdom.crime scene chaplain1

Being poor do not make people commit crimes. Ruthless lifestyles and a lack of scholastic currency are two motivating factors in the life of the criminal because one refuses to fairly compete for economic resources. I once asked an offender why he wouldn’t offend in certain neighborhoods. He responded by saying, “Those white…

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